Off Topic Post: Goodbye, Shirley Temple!

In all of the years that I’ve written about old movies, I’ve never done an essay about Shirley Temple…but that doesn’t mean I don’t love her. She was, and will always be, a star.

Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple in the full bloom of her stardom. She died yesterday, at 85.

Off Topic Post: Happy Birthday, Paul Newman!

Happy birthday to my lifelong favourite actor, Paul Newman! He would have been eighty-nine today.

Paul Newman in 1954

Paul Newman in 1954.

“If you’re playing a poker game and you look around the table and can’t tell who the sucker is, it’s you.”-Paul Newman

What is your number one Paul Newman flick?

[The Classic Movie History Project Blogathon] 1918: The Magic of Mabel and Mickey

When I was fifteen, I learned the truth behind Norma Desmond’s famous Sunset Boulevard assertion: “We didn’t need dialogue. We had faces!” Six decades of repetition has eroded this cutting indictment to a fragment of its original self, denuded of meaning even as it has become a pithy pop-culture sound bite that the least film savvy person can repeat with cocksure swagger. My enlightenment came in the form of a dusty, jacket free old book crammed with its fellows on a shelf at the public library. Subject: silent movie star portraiture. Impact: sudden, immense, striking. A well-established love of the arts, history, and old movies hadn’t prepared me for what I found in this neglected volume of photography. Questions rushed my senses: Who were these women and men? Why was their beauty sung not to the heavens but inarticulately whispered of in a suburban teenager’s bedroom? What happened to them? When did  mystery and imagination leave entertainment photography, resulting in the garish, empty images that had engulfed my recent 1980s childhood?

TWO OF MY EARLY FAVOURITES:

Lya De Putti

Lya De Putti, whose movie career started in 1918.

Valeska Suratt by Orval Hixon, 1916

Valeska Suratt by Orval Hixon, 1916. Her brief  bid for silent screen stardom ended in 1917.

The trajectory of my life changed the day I checked out that book. A passion for old movies expanded to include silent films. I watched as many as I could find, and read everything available on the subject in our large library system. Result: hooked, permanently. Bonus: growing up to write about what I love, including silent movie culture.

Amidst the flavors of the day and luckless publicity seekers, the stars whose fame flamed into the sky with the spark and longevity of an uncontrollable firecracker, and those with fleshy charms but little talent, there stood performers with skill, magnetism, and dedication to a craft that was being forged as the cameras rolled. Some are remembered-if only for the persistence of their images in twenty-first century advertising-but most are forgotten, their work rarely seen by the modern masses. In a world where Mary Pickford has been reduced to the curve of her curls and Lillian Gish to her shy, arcane smile, where Charlie Chaplin is nothing but the sum of the sartorial trio of hat, cane, and shoes, what chance does Mabel Normand stand to be recognized and appreciated as a first-class artist? Even her lovely face is a fading footnote. Continue reading

Daily Diversion #109: So I Walked into a Bookstore…

…and walked out with only 3 books!

  1. Silent Movies The Birth of Film and the Triumph of Movie Culture by Peter Kobel and the Library of Congress
  2. Gene Kelly A Life of Dance and Dreams by Alvin Yudkoff
  3. Lonelyhearts The Screwball World of Nathanael West and Eileen McKenney by Marion Meade
Silent Movies

Silent Movies

I’ve wanted this book since it first hit shelves 5 years ago. Continue reading

Inspiration Board-9th March 2013

Today my muses are spread so far across the map that there really is no map. Yay for eclectic inspiration. Enjoy!

I cannot get enough of John Grant’s new song, Pale Green Ghosts. It is the soundtrack for my packed writing weekend.

Voices from the Grave #56: Louis Bromfield and Malabar Farm

This video is a bit different, as it does not feature the writer’s voice. It’s a documentary clip about Ohio native Louis Bromfield. He and my mom share a hometown (Mansfield). I actually lived in the area until we moved to Columbus when I was 9; several of my close family members still reside in this corner of Richland County. I grew up going to Malabar Farm, swooning equally over its Hollywood connection (Bogie and Bacall were married there) and Bromfield’s status as a major  writer (he won a Pulitzer Prize). I hope you’ll bear with me and watch the video in its entirety, as it perfectly captures this great Ohioan’s contributions to literature and film and, most importantly, the development of conservation and agriculture practices that helped save American farming.

A Year in Books/Day 223: Swanson on Swanson

  • Title: Swanson on Swanson
  • Author: Gloria Swanson
  • Year Published: 1980/This Edition: 1981 (Random House/Pocket Books)
  • Year Purchased: Mid-1990s
  • Source: Antique Barn, Ohio State Fair
  • About: “Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.”-George Bernard Shaw. Every Hollywood memoir should come with the preceding GBS quote as a disclaimer. That, or the generic perception is reality. Either will do. With that out of the way, we could get down to the important business of enjoying good Tinseltown autobiographies for what they are: damn fun entertainment. Underneath the ego and the stage-managed pathos, these one-person exercises in reputation preservation usually contain heaping amounts of self-deprecation, humor, and memorable industry anecdotes, with the self-subjects somehow, through a strange, magical process, coming across as down-to-earth and larger than life; normal and privileged; lucky and talented; flawed and beautiful. Continue reading