What Are You Reading in March?

March is a transitional month: the weather, seasons, and reading habits are all in flux. For me, the latter has been a big disappointment. I still haven’t been able to get my reading pace up to its normal levels. Oh, well! There’s always April!

Since 1st March, I’ve read:

  • I Loved Her in the Movies: Memories of Hollywood’s Legendary Actresses by Robert Wagner and Scott Eyman
I’m currently reading:
  • Hot from Harlem: Twelve African American Entertainers, 1890-1960 by Bill Reed
  • You Must Remember This: Life and Style in Hollywood’s Golden Age by Robert Wagner and Scott Eyman

I promise to do better in April!

What is your favorite book this month?

Which book on your list do you most look forward to reading?

Please share in the comments!

Happy reading.

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What Are You Reading in March?

What is on your reading list this month?

Do your reading habits change with the seasons, or are you at all times equal opportunity?

After last month’s lighter vacation reading schedule, I’m back to my usual heavy rotation of books.

Since 1st March, I’ve finished:

  • Victorian Women and the Theatre of Trance: Mediums, Spiritualists, and Mesmerists in Performance by Amy Lehman
  • Nicholas Ray: The Glorious Failure of an American Director by Patrick McGilligan

I’m in the midst of reading:

  • Shakespeare’s Restless World: A Portrait of an Era in Twenty Objects by Neil MacGregor
  • Women of the Underground: Art: Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves Edited by Zora Von Burden
  • Hawthorne: A Life by Brenda Wineapple

To be finished by 31 March:

  • Keepers: The Greatest Films–and Personal Favorites–of a Moviegoing Lifetime by Richard Schickel
  • Paris in the Fifties by Stanley Karnow
  • Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the Dawn of the Modern Woman by Sam Wasson
  • Women of the Underground: Music: Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves Edited by Zora Von Burden

What is your favourite book this month?

Which book on your list are you most looking forward to reading?

Please share with me in the comments!

Happy reading.

My Year in Books (Sort Of), Part One

Another year is (almost) over. Before we flip the calendar to 2016, and start new reading lists, let’s look back at the reading year that was. I’ll share if you reciprocate in the comments!

  • How many books did you read this year? 50+. My numbers were held down by many heavy, lengthy books.
  • Which genre prevailed? Nonfiction, by miles and miles.
  • Which book was your fave? A Writer’s Diary by Virginia Woolf.
  • Least fave? If You Want to Write: A Book About Art, Independence and Spirit by Brenda Ueland. My loathing for this book knows no bounds.
  • Recommend three books from your list. The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore; Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys by Viv Albertine; Van Gogh: The Life by Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith.

PART TWO WILL APPEAR IN THE NEW YEAR!

[Forgotten Gems] Free e-books Edition: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater by Thomas De Quincey

Confessions of an English Opium-Eater by Thomas De Quincey

Cover of the Second Edition of Confessions of an English Opium Eater, 1823

Cover of the Second Edition of Confessions of an English Opium Eater, 1823

A Year in Books/Day 223: Swanson on Swanson

  • Title: Swanson on Swanson
  • Author: Gloria Swanson
  • Year Published: 1980/This Edition: 1981 (Random House/Pocket Books)
  • Year Purchased: Mid-1990s
  • Source: Antique Barn, Ohio State Fair
  • About: “Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.”-George Bernard Shaw. Every Hollywood memoir should come with the preceding GBS quote as a disclaimer. That, or the generic perception is reality. Either will do. With that out of the way, we could get down to the important business of enjoying good Tinseltown autobiographies for what they are: damn fun entertainment. Underneath the ego and the stage-managed pathos, these one-person exercises in reputation preservation usually contain heaping amounts of self-deprecation, humor, and memorable industry anecdotes, with the self-subjects somehow, through a strange, magical process, coming across as down-to-earth and larger than life; normal and privileged; lucky and talented; flawed and beautiful. Continue reading