[Epic of World Saga] Episode 3: The Thing in the Ruin, Part 1!

Benjamin Banneker is trapped under thousands of tons of rubble – and he’s not alone.

Will he make it out alive?

There’s only one way to find out…

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[Mae’s Writing Days] I Finished a Script… and it Feels so Good!

I finished my first script for Epic of World Saga yesterday. It took me a little less than two hours to write, which is not as impressive as it sounds. The completed episode should come in at around 10, maybe 12 minutes.

Frances Marion (1918)

Although short, this episode is important for a few reasons. It marks the introduction of my lead character, Hilda, while simultaneously imparting important world-building information and setting up the next entry in the series (the latter of which is a true EoWS rarity, as we normally don’t move things along in chronological order). 

Hilda has been living in my brain for nearly a year, so it is incredibly fun to finally free her from those confines and see what she can achieve in her world. I’d like to think she’s off to a fine start. You can find out for yourself when the episode airs in September.

Miscellaneous Epic of World Saga Updates…

 I am usually a good girl about maintaining the focus of ASPL, so I hope you forgive me when I occasionally go off-subject. When I do, it’s usually in support of one of my other projects. Like this!

Although I try to keep things compartmentalized, sometimes I just have to share updates. Like now!

Here’s what is going on over at Epic of World Saga.

If you love old pulp fiction magazines, do we have the covers (and commentary) for you!

Fantastic Universe (September 1959)

Fantastic Adventures (February 1950)

Kev debuted a new series on May 5th. It’s all about classic sci-fi and adventure radio programs.

There are so many wonderful things on the horizon for EoWS, but this is all I’ll thrust on you today. I’ll be back with the regularly scheduled programming in a couple of hours. Until then, thanks for your indulgence.

Happy Birthday, H.G. Wells!

“The only true measure of success is the ratio between what we might have done and what we might have been on the one hand, and the thing we have made and the things we have made of ourselves on the other.”

H.G. (Herbert George) Wells was born on 21 September 1866:

H.G. Wells by F. Hollyer, 1890

H.G. Wells by F. Hollyer, 1890.

Happy Birthday, Robert A. Heinlein!

My husband’s favourite author, Robert A. Heinlein, was born on 7 July 1907.

1929 Naval Academy Yearbook Photo of Robert A. Heinlein

1929 Naval Academy Yearbook Photo of Robert A. Heinlein

“A prude is a person who thinks that his own rules of propriety are natural laws.”-Robert A. Heinlein

Fuel for My Jetpack, Mead for My Dragon

Doing the impossible is a lot harder than it sounds.

Being a science-fiction or fantasy writer is hard.  Wrestling with the hassle of plot, theme, character, setting, transition, voice, and deeply rooted psycho-sexual subtext is hard enough without having to deal with the added challenge of hanging the threads of your story from the rafters of disbelief in order to satisfy the demands of the genre.  As if these hurdles weren’t high enough, the problem of inspiration when it comes to thinking up a memorable and appropriately science-fictiony or fantastical-without-being-embarrassingly-flamboyant name for characters and exotic lands becomes even more frustrating when writer’s block insists on being a squatter in the house of ideas.

Fortunately, the Internet hosts a series of solutions to this problem in the form of name generators.  Name generators are applications that are programed to combine a number of different elements of vowel sounds, consonant constructions and a slew of other linguistic elements into new configurations that give you just the unearthly quality you need to sound authentic.

One of the first and best experiences I’ve had is with seventhsanctum.com, a website by Steven Savage featuring a particularly robust set of generators.  Not content to focus on names alone, the site enables the visitor to play with a number of different subjects, from character names to planet names, story ideas, character skills and even ideas for when good old cousin Writer’s Block stops in for a few days.

A quick click on Elf Names – described as “Names for both Tolkeinesque elves, Wild Elves, and general fantasy,” – opens up a page that requests the number of names desired (up to 25), a category field offering the choices of High Elves, Wild Elves or Full Names, and a generate button.  A selection of ten High Elf names renders thus:

Aderlusn Hammerfinder
Adsaar Smilefollower
Atagear Firewand
Atleid Lakemaker
Goglaal Prayerstealer
Ilburb Mercyblade
Ilolain Rainvoyager
Lorhaeg Dreamfletcher
Naratg Featherfollower
Otibnadr Hawkbrewer

Somewhere in there is my future pen name.  Or hotel-check-in alias.

           The names don’t always have to be exotic.  Utilizing information from the US Census, seventhsanctum.com’s Quick Name Generator can supply you with garden-variety appellations that can also be frustratingly difficult to come up with without sounding bland. Kristina Scott, Lily Cash, and Stefanie Hatfield would agree – were they real people.

           The site is a blessing for anyone looking for humor or inspiration in writing their story or bringing their role-playing game setting and characters to life.  It was put together with an obvious love for writing and creativity.  Not content to simply kitbash the English language and leave it at that, there are several links to other sites and features meant to aid the artist’s mind in advancing technique and even suggestions as to how to make forays into the world of getting paid to do what you love.

           So the next time you seethe with frustration when you find that somebody else preemptively stole your idea to name the dashing hero Han Solo or Aragorn, head on over to seventhsanctum.com to kick-start your creative slump, and find a doorway into a great community as well.

KMS