A Bookstore is Gone, Long Live the Books! Part 2–A Literary Chronicle: 1920-1950 by Edmund Wilson

A local used bookstore recently closed after 25 years. They had a fantastic going-out-of-business sale. While part of me feels “guilty” for taking advantage of their sad circumstances, the rest (and logical) part of me knows that they needed to sell as many books as possible. Through these books, a bit of their entrepreneurial and intellectual spirit will live on. With that idea in mind, I’m doing a limited-run series where I’ll spotlight each of the volumes I “adopted” from this sweet little shop. Shine on, you bookish gems!

Today’s selection? A Literary Chronicle: 1920-1950 by Edmund Wilson.

A Literary Chronicle: 1920-1950 by Edmund Wilson

DETAILS:

  • TITLE: THE LITERARY CHRONICLE: 1920-1950
  • AUTHOR: EDMUND WILSON
  • YEAR PUBLISHED: 1956
  • DOUBLEDAY ANCHOR BOOKS
  • COVER AND TYPOGRAPHY: EDWARD GOREY
  • SHOUT-OUT TO “CHARLES D. KLAPP,” WHO OWNED THIS COPY IN 1957. THANKS FOR WRITING YOUR NAME IN THE BOOK!

WHY I BOUGHT IT:

I like Edmund Wilson, sue me. I don’t always agree with his pronouncements (far from it), but I appreciate his style. The elegant cover (by my beloved Edward Gorey!) makes this book a beautiful visual addition to my collection.

Thanks for reading! I hope you like the new series. Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

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4 thoughts on “A Bookstore is Gone, Long Live the Books! Part 2–A Literary Chronicle: 1920-1950 by Edmund Wilson

  1. Excellent I feel the same way about buying books from a shop that is going out of business. It’s sad and I would like MORE stores to open instead. But you’re right, they need to get rid of their stock and it’s only right to help them.

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    • I was sad AND happy at the same time. They had thousands of books to get rid of, too. I bought around 19, and love all of my choices. I could’ve easily bought ten times that amount, though. I know that they were donating some of the leftovers to prisons, etc.

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  2. I hear you re: guilt about buying product from a shop going out of business. But, you’re right – they need to sell as many as possible.

    This is a terrific idea for a series. Looking forward to seeing your other treasures. 🙂

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    • I’m glad I’m not the only one who feels that way!

      Thanks! I ended up buying something like 19 books over a few visits. Picked up a few film books, one of which is so obscure and rare that I’m still researching its origins. Think you’ll dig that post.

      Liked by 1 person

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