New Year’s Day Book Hunt

My favourite New Year’s Day tradition doesn’t involve parades or football games or overindulging in sweets. For this girl, it is all about books. Shocking, no?

A pile 'o books and calendars.

A pile ‘o books and calendars.

This pile ‘o goodies is the result of my annual New Year’s Day Book and Calendar Hunt. As you can see, the 2013 edition was quite successful. I decided to by-pass literature in favour of selections from the genres of art, biography, and silent film. Here are a few of the highlights:

Egon Schiele by Sandra Forty

Egon Schiele by Sandra Forty

REASON: Egon Schiele is my favourite artist (in a three-way tie with Modigliani and Pissarro).

Frontier Madam The Life of Dell Burke, Lady of Lusk by June Willson Read

Frontier Madam The Life of Dell Burke, Lady of Lusk by June Willson Read

REASON: Who could pass up a book with a title like this?

The Complete Films of Buster Keaton by Jim Kline

The Complete Films of Buster Keaton by Jim Kline

REASON: I write about silent cinema, plus I have mad love for Buster Keaton. Mad love.

Other purchases (not shown):

  • Amedeo Modigliani Nudes and Portraits by Anette Kruszynski
  • Angela Lansbury A Life on Stage and Screen by Rob Edelman and Audrey E. Kupferberg
  • Bing Crosby A Pocketful of Dreams The Early Years 1903-1940 by Gary Giddins
  • Moving Pictures American Art and Early Film 1880-1910 by Nancy Mowll Mathews With Charles Musser

What are you reading this month?

 

8 thoughts on “New Year’s Day Book Hunt

  1. I am keen to read your review of “Frontier Madam”. (What a terrific find!) Also, I completely understand your mad love for Buster Keaton.

    I am still reading “Bring on the Empty Horses” by the delightful David Niven, and have just picked up “Half Blood Blues” from the library (our next book club selection).

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    • Ooh, you will have to let me know what you think of Half-Blood Blues. It looks fantastic. As for Frontier Madam, which I am halfway through already, don’t get your hopes up. Really, it is not as good as it could be. She is fascinating, to be sure, but the writing is problematic.

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      • Yeah, I bought it on a whim because it looked really good. There is a lot of padding because, even after 100 interviews of family, friends, and townspeople, the author could not really penetrate her subject’s private life or even trace anything but her basic movements for the first 30 years of her life. That is not a problem, in and of itself; I have read many excellent books where the biographer was similarly hamstrung. It is the nature of the padding, coupled with some truly dull writing, that makes the book something of a letdown.

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